Coveted Crib: Doullut Steamboat Houses (Part 2)

On Friday I told you a bit about the Doullut Steamboat Houses. You can read the first half of the story here.


As you may have guessed, the houses were influenced architecturally by the steamboats that Doullot himself navigated. The deep decks that surround the houses, their narrow inner hallways, round smokestack chimneys, and square portholes, as well as the Mississippi River facing belvedere, are all distinctly derived from the vessels' architecture. Also in nautical fashion, much of the building (interior and exterior) was constructed with tin, and of course, the ornate woodwork with unusual pearls on the balconies is inspired by those on the steamboats that cruise the mighty Mississippi. In addition, the houses share many qualities with Louisiana plantation homes, which are generally grand, symmetrical, and boxy, featuring balconies and columns or pillars.

What you may not have suspected of the steamboat houses is that they were also largely influenced by the Japanese exhibit building, or teahouse garden building, at the St. Louis World's Fair 1904, also known as the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. The exhibit building spawned the second level and pilot house concave roofs and glazed tiling of the scroll-shaped columns of these New Orleans treasures.

400 Egania Street:

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503 Egania Street:

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