Architect Stories: Oscar Niemeyer

Architect Stories: Oscar Niemeyer

Oscar Niemeyer is considered one of the most important names in modern architecture worldwide, and he just turned 100 this December. His pièce de résistance is not a building, but a city — Brasília, the capital city of Brazil. He was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1907, graduated from Escola de Belas Artes (also in Rio) as an engineer architect in 1934, and joined the office of architect Lucio Costa in 1936. Together they designed the new headquarters for the Ministry of Education and Public Health in Rio, the Brazilian pavilion at the New York World's Fair, and the new plan for the city of Brasília l in 1956. The world can thank him for many other architectural gems, which are marked by clean and dynamic lines and an aversion to right angles, including the UN Headquarters in New York, the Brazilian National Stadium, Samba Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, the Museum of Modern Art of Caracas and the French Communist Party headquarters. He is also chiefly credited for the first national style in modern architecture, Brazilian architectural Modernism. To see some of his works, check out this slideshow.
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